NYC Gyms Criticize COVID Restriction Disparities, Want Help

NYC Gyms Criticize COVID Restriction Disparities, Want Help

[ad_1]

NEW YORK — The fitness industry in the city has taken multiple hits during the coronavirus pandemic. Gyms in the five boroughs are allowed to operate at 25% capacity only, while class-based gyms aren’t able to operate at all.

Meantime, gyms elsewhere in the state can operate at 33% capacity. Many in the industry have been raising concerns about the disparity, while at the same time calling on the federal government to step in and help.

Debra Strougo, founder of Row House, a class-based gym in the city, joined NY1’s Dean Meminger on Friday to discuss the Gym Mitigation and Survival Act that has been introduced in Congress. Its goal is to help gyms operate at a more lucrative rate across the country while adhering to COVID-19 restrictions.

“In many instances, the gym industry was the first to close, it was the last to reopen, and in New York City, many of us are still not allowed to be open,” Strougo said.

She added that Gov. Andrew Cuomo permitting contact sports also adds to the confusion, sending a message of inconsistent enforcement.

——

Did you know you can now watch, read and stay informed with NY1 wherever and whenever you want? Get the new Spectrum News app here.

——

Watch the full interview above.

——

Looking for an easy way to learn about the issues affecting New York City?

Listen to our “Off Topic/On Politics” podcast: Apple Podcasts | Google Play | Spotify | iHeartRadio | Stitcher | RSS

—–

Further Coronavirus Coverage

What to Do If You Test Positive for COVID-19

Who Will Get a Coronavirus Vaccine First — And Who Decides?

How Hospitals Protect Against the Spread of Coronavirus

Coronavirus Likely Spreads Without Symptoms

Coronavirus: The Fight to Breathe

Experts Say Masks Are Still a Must

The Race for a Coronavirus Vaccine

The U.S. May Face a Second Wave of Coronavirus Infections

Cuomo Granted Broad New Powers as New York Tackles Coronavirus

[ad_2]

Source link

Jake Robert